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Natural cleaning essentials for a low-tox home


Natural Cleaning Essentials For A Low-Tox Home

Image: Daiga Ellaby | Unsplash

Those utilitarian plastic bottles that live beneath our sinks may not look like much, but household cleaners account for a large amount of the harmful chemicals in our homes. We find a welcome alternative in Saba Organics.

Last year, as the country headed into the lockdown bubble, I found out I was pregnant. The news was a welcome reminder that, no matter what, life goes on, but even more than the effect of 2020’s shape-shifting antics, getting pregnant signalled huge shifts in my life.

I was to become a new mother, but before I got there, I needed to navigate nine months of pregnancy. And let me tell you, growing a human is no small feat.

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That first doctor’s appointment is an onslaught of information, consisting largely of a long list of things you must avoid. Namely, alcohol and smoking (obviously), raw fish, pink meat, soft cheeses and on and on. What often aren’t included, however, are the toxic chemicals found in everyday items such as plastic packaging and household cleaning products.

I have spent the last few years slowly eliminating toxins from my home, but news of my pregnancy sprang me into action.

My first port of call? Household cleaners. Those utilitarian plastic bottles that live beneath our sinks may not look like much, but household cleaners account for a large amount of the harmful chemicals swirling around our modern homes. Many include volatile chemicals known to cause asthma, headaches and even cancer and organ damage.

The Environmental Working Group, a US-based non-profit advocacy organisation, reviewed more than 2000 cleaning products, finding more than half that contained ingredients that irritate the lungs.

Scientists think many of these widely used chemicals may harm pregnant women and their developing babies by meddling with gene regulators and hormones.

Without delving too far into the science, it’s fair to say you shouldn’t need a PhD in biochemistry to decipher product labels. Thankfully, a new wave of non-toxic cleaners are making easy work of replacing their potentially harmful counterparts (and releasing me from my terrible DIY cleaning product skills).

The range really excels in offering an olfactory experience, with fresh and floral scents that are obvious without being nose-burners.

Saba Organics is a brand I have tried and loved. Their bio-cleaning range is allergen-free, 100 per cent biodegradable and free of petrochemicals, artificial fragrances and nasty fumes. But if it was the brand’s non-toxic promise that drew me in, it was the effective and luxurious products that saw me stick around.

Take Saba Organics’ alpine forest-scented bath and tile gel, which made cleaning my bathroom feel more like a self-care ritual than a dreaded chore, or their lavender laundry liquid, which has replaced any need to search high and low for a natural perfume.
The range really excels in offering an olfactory experience, with fresh and floral scents that are obvious without being nose-burners — a problem I’ve encountered several times while trialling natural home cleaners.

Understandably, there’s a worry that non-toxic products won’t be as effective as conventional cleaners, but I’ve never had any sticky residue horror stories or problems with yellowing tiles while using Saba Organics.

And their range isn’t so big you’ll be lost in a rabbit hole of, say, shower cleaners. There’s a multipurpose spray that does exactly what it says on the tin, a gel dedicated to bathroom cleaning, one for your floors, one for your dishes and one for glass. When variety is needed, such as washing tricky delicate items, Saba provides us with a eucalyptus-scented wool wash on top of the all-rounder laundry liquid and softener.

That handful of bottles that I can rely on without worrying about my health, or the health of my growing baby, has been a welcome addition to the cupboard underneath my sink.

For more, visit sabaorganics.com



 

Charlie Hale

Charlie Hale is the Deputy Editor of WellBeing, EatWell and WILD. ​She writes about a plethora of things women care about — from pasta to politics and everything in between.