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Inspired living

Y tofu?


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Gen Y are an often discussed, and occasionally maligned, generation. Research shows that Gen Y-ers (also known as “Millennials” born between the early 1980s and the year 2000) are tech-savvy, family oriented, team players, ambitious, and like to be loved. Marketers of course want to know about Gen Y because they are next generation consumers so what motivates them becomes of interest. For instance, it seems that Gen Y women are embracing tofu but new research suggests it is not for the reasons that you might think.

Tofu is made by coagulating soy milk, from soybeans, and pressing it into a block. Soy is a high-quality protein. It is one of only two known plant foods (the other is amaranth seed) to contain all the essential amino acids, similar to those found in meat. Additionally, soy contains phytoestrogens that mimic the effects of oestrogen (although to a much weaker degree) and calcium. For these reasons soy, and therefore tofu, has been known to have benefits for the heart and also in treating menopause.

According to the new research, though, it appears that health reasons are not what is attracting Gen Y women to tofu.

Tofu has been a staple of Asian cuisines for hundreds of years because of its ability to absorb new flavours through spices and marinades. It looks like it is this nature of tofu that has made it appealing to Gen Y.

The researchers found that Gen Y do not care about the health benefits of tofu but instead eat it because it is quick to cook and it is filling. They say that Gen Y are much more likely to embrace tofu if you tell them that it is quick, cooks like chicken and doesn’t go off like chicken.

It would appear we can add “pragmatic” to that list of Gen Y qualities.



 

Terry Robson

Terry Robson is the Editor-in-Chief of WellBeing and the Editor of EatWell.