Could rose quartz be the key to youthful skin?

written by The WellBeing Team

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Energy. Vibration. Nurture. Love. Rose quartz, often referred to as “the ice of the gods”, has long been used in beauty, medicinal and religious rituals and is now being introduced by spas keen to include this alluring stone into treatments. The results? Incredible. Forget botox. Iron out fine lines and bring out your inner radiance using earth’s natural elements.

The name quartz derives from the Greek word krustallos, which translates as “ice”. Regarded as our earth’s most abundant mineral, quartz is made from a combination of silicon and oxygen. From amethyst (purple) to citrine (yellow), quartz is regarded as the chameleon of gemstones as it is found in various colours. But it is rose quartz, the pink variety, that has captured the hearts of spa creators around the globe.

Rose quartz is found in many countries, including India, Germany and the USA, but the best quality is said to derive from Brazil. In many cultures, such as China and Japan, rose quartz symbolises love and energy. Workers will often use rose quartz to open the heart chakra, cleanse and heal. Rose quartz mala bead necklaces are worn close to the heart for this reason.

Healthwise, rose quartz is said to be effective in releasing energy. It’s reported that Tibetans and Indians have long applied these crystals, cool and heated, during medicinal treatments. Acupuncturists sometimes coat their needles in quartz to unblock stagnant energy while health practitioners often use this gemstone to help their clients release emotional wounds. All seem to believe the vibration from this stone nourishes, heals and promotes joy.

Brett Smith, of Stone Eagle Handcrafted Massage Stones (www.massagestones.com), has collected and worked with stones for decades. His passion? To craft granite, marble and semi-precious stones into stunning massage stones for spas, salons and clinics the world over.

“The rose quartz gemstone is traditionally the stone of unconditional love and harmony and, as such, is ideal for use in facials,” he reports.

“Rose quartz is said to help heal the emotional heart by assisting in the release of unexpressed emotions and heartache, and is comforting, calming and reassuring. It’s good for use in crisis. Strengthening empathy and sensitivity, it helps foster self-love, self-worth, self- forgiveness, acceptance, trust and loving others. What better use than in facials, on the visage we show the world? Let the beauty that is inside be shown through your face.”

I know from personal experience that this is true. Recently, I had a rose quartz facial delivered with rosehip oils and yummy rose-infused creams and masks that left my skin glowing for days. During the facial, the therapist smoothed the warmed crystals in figure-eight motions around they eye area, along the jawline in upward motions, lightly pressing the stones into various points, including my temples. She explained that when the crystals are heated circulation is improved, which in turn floods the skin with oxygen. This helps remove waste and toxins from the skin, leaving it looking firm and plumped.

Legends and myths abound around rose quartz. Beauty-wise, the Egyptian goddess Isis apparently rubbed river-tumbled rose quartz over her face in upward motions and around the eyes to help retain her beauty. According to Ayurvedic texts, the radiant energy of warmed rose quartz crystals as they are massaged on the skin, along the energy channels (nadi) and energy points (marmas), replenishes and restores the energy centres within the body. When placed on the correct marma points and chakras, and when warmed and applied to the skin with pure aromatherapy oils, the results are incredible.

The beauty of working with crystals during treatments is they affect both our internal and external wellbeing. Indeed, it’s our individual response to beauty that enlightens. Even the act of observing the absolute exquisiteness of the clear, pink, pure crystal can open the heart. When you wear it close to your body or placed on your skin, be prepared for a moment or two of divinity.

Here are some rose-imbued body-care ideas to inspire, revive, balance and nourish you at home. Created by Naturopath Sally Mathrick (www.soundmedicine.com).

Rose & sandalwood facial spritzer

A subtle rejuvenation ritual for whenever stress levels elevate.
Breathe out fully and have a relaxed pause. As you breathe in, spray your face with this uplifting, balancing facial spritzer.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Blend ingredients in a 100ml spritzer bottle. Shake bottle well before each use.

Rose hand & body scrub

A weekly ritual to support detoxification and skin hydration. Clay gently detoxifies, salts exfoliate and the almond and rose geranium oil nourishes. It leaves your whole body smooth, cleansed and moisturised. Soak up the goodness in a bath after exfoliating.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Mix all ingredients in a sturdy bowl. Apply in small handfuls to your body while sitting or standing over your warm bath. Use long strokes to scrub the mixture over feet, legs, buttocks, torso, arms and hands, exfoliating and cleansing. Add remnants to the bath and soak for 15–30 minutes to promote detoxification.

Rosehip facial oil blend

This is a very good nightly ritual to rehydrate dry, wrinkled facial skin. Results include softer, nourished and hydrated skin texture.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Slowly and gently warm honey so it becomes runny. Mix all ingredients into a 20ml dropper bottle. Shake well. Use 2 drops each night and dab over entire face.

Rose & sandalwood hand balm

Sandalwood and rose are wonderfully earthy and nourishing, and this hand balm brings balance and relaxation.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Stir the essential oils into the lotion well. Apply over your hands daily to keep them moisturised. Store in a 75ml lidded wide-mouth jar.


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The WellBeing Team