Coffee on wooden board with bread and cooking utensils

Is coffee flour the way of the future?

Coffee has been getting some good publicity recently due to some favourable findings from the researchers. One Harvard study for instance, found that people who drink three to five cups of coffee a day have a 15 per cent reduction in death risk from all causes compared to people who don’t drink coffee. Just recently we reported a study showing that coffee can increase physical endurance by up to 24 per cent. Coffee is a complex food with many ingredients leading to its effects but a new study has found that it might be possible to make a “coffee flour” that might be even healthier for you.

The researcher who has developed this method sees the coffee flour being used in flours for baking, breakfast cereals, soups, and even juices.

One of the ingredients in coffee that certainly contributes to any health benefits is chlorogenic acid (CGA), an antioxidant thought to be helpful in modulating sugar metabolism, lowering blood pressure and maybe reducing heart disease and cancer risk. However, when coffee beans are roasted as is usual at above 200 degrees Celsius for 10 to 15 minutes the CGA content can drop by anywhere from 50 to 100 per cent.

In an effort to preserve CGA a researcher has now developed a method of preparing coffee beans that produces a “coffee flour”. In the new technique the coffee beans are parbaked at around 150 degrees Celsius for ten minutes. This means that the bean isn’t roasted long enough to develop flavour but the concentration of CGA was hardly diminished. These beans can’t be used for coffee as the flavour just isn’t there but what happens to them next is that they are milled in an ultra-cold, chemically inert liquid nitrogen atmosphere that is designed to protect the bean’s ingredients from oxidation.

The researcher who has developed this method sees the coffee flour being used in flours for baking, breakfast cereals, soups, and even juices.

It is a tantalising thought, you might be able to have coffee and croissant just by having a “coffee croissant” and you won’t need to dirty a cup.

Terry Robson

Terry Robson

Terry Robson is the Editor-in-Chief of WellBeing and the Editor of EatWell.

You May Also Like

Gmo Genetically Modified Food And Its Effects On The Human Body

GMO (Genetically modified food) and its effects on the human body

Wheat Free Vs Gluten Free Bread Allergy Intolerance

Wheat free, whole wheat and your health

Natural Remedy Cold Flu Season

Cold and flu season – what to do to raise your immunity

Dental Health Is An Important Part Of Your Wellbeing

Dental health is an important part of your wellbeing