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Cooking methods for meat determine high blood pressure risk


grilling meat over flames

Credit:123RF

If you love eating meat, then this news is for you.

Meat eating has been associated with various diseases including the risk of developing diabetes.

It may even raise your risk of developing high blood pressure according to a preliminary research.

It was found that participants who ate at least two servings of red meat, chicken or fish a week had a 17 percent higher risk of developing high blood pressure due to consumption of the highest levels of HAAs.

Scientists analysed cooking methods and investigated the association of developing high blood pressure in people who ate beef, poultry or fish regularly.

The study included 32,925 women taking part in the Nurses’ Health Study; 53,852 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study II; and 17,104 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

None of the participants had high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease or cancer when they enrolled.

The scientists collected detail cooking information from participants in each of these long term studies.

After a follow-up of 12-16 years, the researchers found that 37,123 people developed high blood pressure.

Among participants who reported eating at least two servings of red meat, chicken or fish a week, the analysis revealed that the risk of developing high blood pressure was 17 percent higher in those who grilled, broiled or roasted their meat more than 15 times a month compared with less than four times a month.

Those who preferred their meat well done had a 15 percent risk of developing high blood pressure.

When meat protein is charred or exposed to very high temperatures, it produces chemicals called heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs).

It was found that participants who ate at least two servings of red meat, chicken or fish a week had a 17 percent higher risk of developing high blood pressure as this gives them the opportunity to consume of the highest levels of HAAs.

The researchers noted that the relationship between high blood pressure and cooking temperature, method and doneness was independent of the amount or type of food consumed.

The researchers explain that cooking meats at high temperature produces oxidative stress, inflammation and insulin resistance as seen in previous studies.

This affects the inner linings of blood vessels. It is also associated with the development of atherosclerosis – a disease which causes the arteries to become narrowed.

The study does not take into account other meats that are consumed and is limited to beef, chicken and fish.

The finding suggests that we can reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure if you don’t eat these foods cooked well done.

It’s also best to avoid the use of open-flame and/or high-temperature cooking methods, including grilling, barbequing and broiling.

Love your meat but cook it sensibly to avoid problems with your heart.

Source: American Heart Association



 

Meena Azzollini

Meena is passionate about holistic wellbeing, alternative healing, health and personal power and uses words to craft engaging feature articles to convey her knowledge and passion. She is a freelance writer and content creator from Adelaide, Australia, who draws inspiration from family, travel and her love for books and reading.

A yoga practitioner and a strong believer in positive thinking, Meena is also a mum to a very active young boy. In her spare time, she loves to read and whip up delicious meals. She also loves the smell of freshly made coffee and can’t ever resist a cheesecake. And she gets tickled pink by anything funny!